[identity profile] banerry.livejournal.com posting in [community profile] whatnancysaid
In case you were wondering, this edition isn't any more interesting than the revised version.

"After her last trouble with the police [Conger's daughter] disappeared and was never heard from again. She did not return home even for her father's funeral.'
'That was gratitude,' Bess murmured, especially when the old man sacrificed his entire fortune for her.'" (page 68)
... So does Bess always murmur when old men sacrifice their entire fortunes for her, or was that the result of a forgotten quotation mark?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The marble piece was still imposing, though weatherbeaten and old. The group consisted of three sculpted figures; a life-sized likeness of a beautiful girl with flowing hair, on either side of which, at a little distance, stood a smaller statue. The central figure bore a startling resemblance to Nancy." (page 69)
Narrator: "And the two smaller, less important figures looked just like Bess and George!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"A large truck had come to an abrupt stop in the driveway. A swarthy, heavy-set foreigner
... I don't think I want to know why she thinks she can tell that he's foreign just by looking at him.
climbed from the cab, approaching the group with quick, hurried steps.
'You own-a da place?'
And have I mentioned how much I hate written-out accents?
he questioned Nancy, his manner eager and impatient.
'No, I do not,' the girl replied emphatically.
Ignoring her denial, and speaking rapidly, the man told Nancy that he was a contractor. He would like the job of wrecking the old mansion and disposing of the marble statues.
Man: "Especially that ugly one in-a da center."
'I can't give you permission to dismantle the place,' Nancy said firmly.
'I do-a good work,' he insisted. 'I no cheat. I honest man. When I make-a da promise, my word fine.'
'I'm not doubting your integrity at all,' Nancy replied,
Nancy: "I just prefer to hire my own kind, that's all."
somewhat amused at the man's insistence. 'I don't own the place so I couldn't possibly give the job to you.'
It was evident that the contractor thought Nancy was merely endeavoring to drive a hard bargain." (page 71-72)
Narrator: "Remember kids, foreign people are stupid as well as dirty and smelly!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The man still was not satisfied, but he was diverted from further questioning by the sudden appearance of his pet monkey
Whaaaaaaat.
which had escaped from its tether in the truck.
My prediction: next, we are going to find out that this man is actually a gypsy.
Instead of seeking its master, however, the little animal espied the tall porch pillars of the ancient outse. With astonishing agility he shot up one of them and squatted down near a window on the roof.
His master grew very agitated. He scolded the monkey in broken English and then tried his native tongue, but the little fellow did not choose to understand." (page 72)
Because it's not as if animals aren't born understanding perfect English, of course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I get you! I get you! [the man] shrieked. 'And when I do, Jocko, of you I make-a da hash!'" (page 73)
I'm starting to feel kinda dirty reading this.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Over and over Nancy pleaded with [Jocko] to come down. He eyed her intently but would not obey.
Deciding that the monkey was afraid of her because she was a stranger, Nancy moved back behind the marble statue, leaving a trail of peanuts in her wake. Half-hidden from view, she then called Jocko in whispered tones." (page 77)
Naturally, disembodied voices/talking statues are SO much less threatening than strangers.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy could not hide her disappointment. She had expected to meet the old lady of the black cloak,
Oh please, everyone knows that's just a legend, Nancy.
but obviously there were two persons in Sea Cliff by the same name. She explained about the bag having been left by mistake in her room at the Seaside Hotel.
'I've lost no luggage,' the woman replied, glancing at the suitcase. 'I never owned one like that, either.'

Unnoticed by Nancy, the small boy had been tampering with the fastenings of the case. At a sharp word from Miss Morse he scuttled away.
'That child next door is a dreadful pest,' the woman apologized. 'Always prying into things.'
Nancy laughed good-naturedly
Nancy: "Oh, you should hear what the neighbors say about me..."
and reached down to pick up the bag.
Nancy: "Mind if I nosily rummage through it now?"
As she lifted it, the lid fell back.
A small black box which appeared to be a make-up kit tumbled to the ground, and with it a woman's blond wig. The clothing which lay exposed the latest style, and of a type usually worn by young women.
'Well, mercy sakes,' Miss Morse murmured in astonishment. 'I guess the owner of that bag must be an actress!'" (page 79-80)
Hey, f that's all you need to have to be labeled an actress, I must know more actresses than I thought! I'll have to ask my old French teacher about her secret side career the next time I see her.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Well, if we can't find the woman, we just can't,' Mr. Trixler next said philosophically.
Brilliant deduction!
'At least we have the satisfaction of knowing we tried to expose a trickster.'" (page 82)
Mr. Trixler: "I'll remember how good it felt to have failed to save a woman from financial ruin till my dying day!"

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'You see, some years ago Charles Owen entered into a partnership with a man by the name of Frank Wormrath.
See, that's his mistake right there. You never want to associate with Nancy Drew characters who have ugly names; they'll only screw you over in the end.
The two men never got along very well together and Owen began to distrust his partner. One night the firm's warehouse was broken into and valuable stock consisting of silk and woolen goods was stolen. THe thefts were never traced.
'Soon after that Wormrath broke up the partnership.
Wormrath: "It's not you, Charlie, it's me."

What puzzled Owen was thaHt although the profits of the firm had never been large, Wormrath suddenly seemed well supplied with money and a fine stock of goods with which to start another company in competition.'
'Did Mr. Owen connect it with the warehouse theft?' Nancy speculated shrewdly.'" (page 86-87)
Don't be so proud of yourself, Nancy- little Tommy Johnson could have figured that out.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'What you need, Dad, is a good brisk swim.'
Nancy: "And by swimming I mean SEX."
'Not at this time of night.'
'It will do you good and make you sleep better,' Nancy urged. 'The moon is full, too, and the beach will be beautiful. I'll go with you.'
Nancy: "It'll be so romanti- no, wait. It's not supposed to be, is it?
'Oh, all right,' Carson Drew agreed unwillingly.
Carson: "But only if you wear that bikini."
However, after a ten-minute dip in the bracing sea he was glad he had listened to his daughter's plea, for he felt alive in every part of his lean body.
Um.
He raced Nancy back to the dressing room.
UM.
'And now to bed and to sleep,' he declared a few minutes later, kissing her good night." (page 88)
Narrator: "What went on in those few minutes will be covered in the ADULT version of this novel."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"In the morning Nancy awoke with a firm determination to try out a little scheme of her own. Telling Bess and George she would not eat breakfast with them,
Nancy: "It's not me, guys, it's you."
she waited in her room until they had gone downstairs. Then she raced to a nearby shop she had noticed previously and purchased a chambermaid's uniform. Hurriedly she returned and changed her clothes.
'I look the part, I'm sure,' she said, glancing at herself in the mirror." (page 92)
Narrator: "... For three hours."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Who's there?' a gruff voice demanded.
Nancy did not dare reply, as she had no master key with which to open the door. Finally the occupant of the room strode across the carpet and in an moment was facing the maid.
'May I make the bed now?' Nancy asked sweetly.
Totally a euphemism.
'Oh, I suppose so,' the man growled. 'Come on in.'" (page 92-93)
Man: "You're not as hot as you looked in that ad, but I suppose you'll do."
The girl's heart began to beat a little faster as she directed a swift, searching glance at the man.
Narrator: "She had already promised herself to Ned (before they were forty, she had sworn), but if it would help further the investigation..."
He was an unpleasant looking individual with a sharp, evil face." (page 92-93)
That's probably my favorite villain!description so far. They don't dance around anything- his face is evil.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy knew that she had located the thief, for in addition to the incriminating brief-case
You'd think that would be enough.
she noticed that the top button of the man's coat was missing." (page 94)
Bah, that'll never hold up in court.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The detained man blustered and fumed.
'It is an outrage to accuse me of stealing [the briefcase],' he retorted angrily. 'I found it in my room when I came in late last night.
Man: "And I... decided to keep it. Yeah."
How it got there I don't know, but I assumed it had been left by the former room occupant. At any rate, I was just turning it in here at the desk.'
'And can you explain away this button just as readily?' Nancy asked sarcastically." (page 95)
That... is not sarcasm.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The man tossed the leatherbrief-case down on the desk. Then, picking up his suitcase, he stalked angrily from the lobby.
'Aren't you going to stop him?' Nancy cried, gazing accusingly at the baffled clerk. 'He ought to be arrested.'
'There really isn't any proof-' the man began apologetically.
'You're afraid to do anything,' Carson Drew said sharply. 'Why not admit the truth?' Turning to his daughter he said, 'Come along, Nancy.'" (page 96-97)
Carson: "We're obviously not wanted here."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'It's too bad [Mr. Owen] doesn't live here in Sea Cliff,' Nancy remarked. 'If he would only come, you could keep an eye on him yourself, Dad, and I might help you?'
'You'd like the job, wouldn't you?' her father teased.
Carson: "Now, now, Nancy, what have I told you time and time again about perving on old men?"
'But I'm afraid Mr. Owen wouldn't feel flattered if he thought we believed him incapable of looking after himself.'
'He needn't know everything,' Nancy chuckled." (page 98-99)
Nancy: "We could always just patronize him to death instead!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Relieved of duty at the helm, the Drew girl
Narrator: "What was her name again...?"
lost no time in attending to the needs of the pilot and his unfortunate passenger. George and Bess were doing the best they could, but were frightened and unable to work calmly." (page 105)
Narrator: "Unlike robot!Nancy, they were hampered by actual human emotions."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Finding a thermos of coffee,
Narrator: "Which they just HAPPENED to have on board their small fishing boat..."
Nancy urged the old man to take a few sips of it. 'It will give you strength and make you feel better,' she urged.
He obediently swallowed some of the hot brew, and as the girl slipped an arm about him for support she had the opportunity to study his face. She judged him
Narrator: "Instantly!"
to be about sixty-two.
Nancy: "Well, there goes my promise to Dad not to get involved with any more older men!"
He had iron gray hair, a kindly countenance, and dark intelligent eyes which denoted quiet courage." (page 106)
Oh my God, it's Gandalf.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'What caused the accident?' Nancy asked quickly.
'I don't know. The first thing I realized, the pilot had started to land on the water. Said he felt sick and stupid.'" (page 107)
Man: "I assured him that having to repeat the fifth grade was nothing to be ashamed about."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The motorboat had traveled some distance from the flaming seaplane, but the blaze had attracted the attention of persons on the shore. Word went around that a pleasure craft had exploded." (page 107)
Tee hee hee.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"At the Seaside Hotel Carson Drew heard of the occurrence but was unable to learn any of the details. Fearing that Nancy and her friends might have been involved,
Carson: "Lord knows how they flock to those pleasure crafts..."
he ran down to the beach to join the crowd that had gathered there." (page 108)
Pfft. Ambulance chasers.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Mr. Carson Drew!' a voice interrupted.
Nancy and her father turned, and saw that the rescued passenger, supported on either side by Jack Kingdon and Bess, had come up directly behind them. He was gazing at the lawyer with an expression of
Narrator: "- unbridled lust."
pleased recognition.
Narrator: "A 1930s euphemism for unbridled lust."
For a moment Carson Drew stared blankly.
'Charles Owen!' he exclaimed at last." (page 108-109)
And absolutely no one is surprised!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Mr. Drew had entered the bedroom again. He pulled up a chair, and at the first opportunity endeavored to speak seriously to his client.
'You had a fortunate escape from death today, Mr. Owen,' he began. 'Next time you may not be so lucky.'
'Next time?' Mr. Owen demanded, sitting up very straight against the pillows. 'I don't figure there will be a next time. Just what are you driving at, Mr. Drew?'" (page 111-112)
Carson: "Well, you see, the hitman I hired should be arriving by Thursday at the latest..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'We really should give Togo a little exercise,' Nancy remarked. 'We've neglected him shamefully the past few days.'" (page 113)
Nancy: "it's a good thing dogs only need to pee a couple times a week!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The three chums hastened to the entrance of the park in time to see Joe Mitza greet a man who evidently was staying in one of the cabins.
Nancy: "Hey, isn't that the same lover we saw him with before?"
'Let's steal up behind the cabin and hear what they are saying,' Nancy proposed.
The camp was nearly deserted, and no one paid any attention to the girls as they retraced their steps, circled the park, and crept up behind the tourist shack. Mitza was boasting to his friend of various disreputable exploits." (page 115)
Mitza: "And man, you wouldn't believe some of the stuff I'd get up to in that pleasure craft that sometimes docks at this town..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Give me that letter!' Joe Mitza cried furiously.
With a scornful smile
Hey, I thought only villains smiled scornfully, Nancy.
Nancy extended it for him to take, but as the man reached out his hand a strong gust of wind carried the envelope away.
Nancy: "Boy, moonlighting as an airbender in my spare time really paid off!"

Togo took up the pursuit, pounced upon the note, and began to tear at it with his sharp teeth.
'Confound that mutt!' Mitza exclaimed angrily.
... Yeah, nobody talks like that in real life.
Snatching up a heavy stick he beat the dog until Togo dropped the letter." (page 118)
And Nancy did... nothing?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Do you know [Mitza]?' Nancy inquired alertly.
'Decidedly. He owes me a bill of nearly ten dollars,
Oh, WOW.
and all for food. I run the Florence Restaurant here at the park.'
'Has Mitza been eating without paying?'
Woman: "... I just said so, didn't i?"
'Yes. He orders everything on the menu
Here's a novel idea, lady: STOP LETTING HIM.
and then pretends he'll pay for it the next day. He claimed his wealthy father was sending him a check, but that it had been delayed.'
'Delayed permanently, I imagine,' Nancy commented dryly.
'I guess I'll go after him right now and threaten to turn him over to the police,' the woman announced.
Woman: "I'm sure he'll know I'm serious business this time!"
'I'll not let him cheat me.'" (page 120)
Woman: "... Anymore."

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As they were looking under the porch of a tourist cabin, an elderly man with a cane came walking slowly down the cinder path. He paused to watch the girls curiously.
'Did you lose anything?' he inquired in a friendly tone.
'Only a piece of paper,' Nancy replied, straightening up to gaze at the old gentleman.
Nancy: "What I wouldn't give to tap that hot piece of-- er, I'm sorry, were you saying something?"
He was an interesting type, agile and active despite his age,
How does she know this? Has Nancy been watching him working out on the sly?
which one might guess to be about seventy." (page 122)
Just the right age for Nancy!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Apparently you were right about the fellow having been drugged. The doctors felt certain of it, and I learned from the aviator that shortly before he took off in the seaplane a stranger accosted him. They struck up a friendly conversation, and the man treated him to a lunch with coffee.'
'Dropping a few pills in the coffee, I suppose,' said Nancy." (page 127)
Date rape, 1930s-style.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"How do you feel, Mr. Owen?' [Nancy] asked.
'Oh, much better, much better,' the man replied. I feel as if I could eat a big meal. Do you suppose you could smuggle in a "T" bone steak for me with French fried potatoes
Mr. Owen: "And a hamburger sandwich?"
and a pot of coffee?'
Nancy: "Sure. Do you want your coffee with or without pills?"
'I'm afraid I couldn't until the nurse returns and says it will be all right,' Nancy smiled. 'You mustn't tire yourself out by talking, either, Mr. Owen.'
'Nonsense! There's no sense in trying to make an invalid of me. Well, if I'm ordered not to talk, then you must do it for me!'
Boy, he relents easily.
'I might tell you about my dog Togo,' the girl laughed, probing her mind for a topic which would amuse the man.'" (page 129)
Nancy: "They call him 'the hellion of River Heights'; I have no idea why."

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'What have you done to him?' [the nurse] demanded angrily of Nancy.
'Nothing,' the girl murmured contritely. 'We talked and--'
Nancy: "I slipped him a little something in his drink, and--"
'You've excited him, that's what you've done.
Nancy: "Well I'm sorry, but I can't help it if I have that affect on older men!"
Oh, I shouldn't have left him for a minute! Call a doctor at once, then go away and don't allow anyone to enter this room!'

It was a new experience for Nancy to be ordered about,
Oh God, is she going to throw a tantrum now?
but she accepted the reprimand meekly.'

Narrator: "Knowing full well that the nurse would pay for her impudence later."
She flew to the telephone, and since she did not know the name of a local doctor she asked the house physician to come upstairs immediately.
'I shouldn't have spoke so harshly,' the nurse apologized.
Nurse: "Please, call off the hitmen and the rabid terrier!"
'I'm sure it wasn't your fault--'
'But it was,' Nancy replied, accepting full responsibility." (page 134-135)
And the moral lesson wasn't obvious at ALL.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Try not to think any more about it until the telegram comes,' George urged, for she saw that Nancy was greatly upset with worry. 'You acted with the best of intentions, and I'm sure no one suspected that Mr. Owen was in such a nervous condition.'" (page 138)
Except for the fact that... they all suspected it. And mentioned it. Multiple times.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When Jack called for the girls later that evening he sensed immediately that something was amiss.
Narrator: "He could smell it in the air."
He too became downcast when he learned of Mr. Owen's condition.
... But he doesn't even know the guy.
Everyone tried to be cheerful and enter into the spirit of the festivities,
Narrator: "But the thought that not every other person in the world was as healthy and fortunate as themselves was a real downer!"
but the entertainment had lost its zest for them all.
This is just reading like a Zoloft commercial now.
The dinner which preceded it was excellent, yet Nancy made only a pretense of eating.
Or an anorexia awareness one.
Later in the ballroom she danced mechanically
She did the Robot?
and more than once was compelled to apologize because she had failed to follow an intricate step." (page 139)
Oh please, they're guys- I doubt they even noticed, Nancy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'No, stay here in the car,' Jack replied. 'I might run into trouble. If I don't return in ten minutes you come after me,
Jack: "You only come when we're sure you'd be endangering yourself." 
or better still, go for help.'
Nancy did not like such an arrangement. She greatly preferred to do her own investigating, but the young man had very decided ideas about gallantry and would not allow her to accompany him.
Narrator: "And so she obeyed him, like the subservient woman that she was!"

While Nancy sat waiting in the car, she tried to figure out what the strange light might signify.
'It's barely possible Mr. Albin is in the house trying to recover the ship model which old Mr. Conger promised him,' she reflected. 'Yet that scarcely seems plausible either, for he's not the type to go prowling into houses at night.'" (page 141-142)
Nancy: "I mean, if he were, surely he would have made a mention of it during our one and only meeting."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Just at that moment [Jack] came down the private driveway, whistling a gay tune." (page 142)
Jack: "I feel pretty, oh so pretty..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy was very quiet. She could not believe that her imagination had tricked her,
Nancy: "My imagination has always been honest with me in the past!"
yet she did not wish to contradict her escort, either." (page 142)
Narrator: "Womenfolk just don't do that sort of thing."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'The woman we met in the park is Alice Owen, the wife of my father's client! She's overwhelmed to learn that her husband still lives,
Mrs. Owen: "That's it- no more hired men! Next time I'm doing the deed myself."
so she must have thought he was dead." (page 143-144)
Oh, I don't know- that's kind of a stretch, Nancy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I feel as if a ten-ton weight had been lifted from my shoulders.'
'So do I,' Mr. Drew admitted. He removed a five-dollar bill from the wallet he carried in his vest pocket. 'Here, you deserve a celebration, Nancy. Take this and buy yourself a good time.'" (page 146)
Narrator: "Images of five-dollar hookers flooded Nancy's mind!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Bess and George] were delighted to accompany Nancy to the business district of Sea Cliff and help her select the new swim suit." (page 147)
Oh, yeah.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy thanked [the hotel clerk] and took the communication, noticing that it was stamped Sea Cliff. At first she thought it might be from Jack, but she immediately abandoned that idea when she saw that the address had been written by a woman.
Oh Nancy, I'm sure *plenty* of guys dot their 'i's with hearts.
Opening the letter, she glanced at the bottom of the page to learn the identity of the writer. Then, her eyes sparkling with excitement, she moved swiftly toward her chums." (page 147)
Bess: "Oh God, she's coming at us! What do we do, George?"
George: "Run! Run!"

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy eagerly scanned the note from Miss Morse, and as she did so her face reflected disappointment.
'What does she have to say?' Bess inquired curiously.
'We're to leave the suitcase at the railroad station checkroom and tell the attendant that Miss Morse will call for it later,' Nancy replied, her eyes still upon the page." (page 148)
Of course, there's nothing suspicious about that at all!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Let's borrow Mr. Trixler's car and drive out to the Old Estate,' [Nancy] said.
Nancy: "And by 'borrow' I mean 'steal'."
'We've seen all there is out at that place,' George protested.
Nancy: "NO ONE can stare at that statue of me for too long. Do you hear me?"
'It certainly seems somehow to fascinate you, Nancy.'
'It does, I'll admit. But I have a special reason for wishing to go this time.'
'To see if the 'Whispering Girl' is still there?' Bess asked teasingly.
'That's it exactly,' Nancy replied soberly." (page 151)
Bess: "So... the same reason as all the other times, then."
Nancy: "Yeah, pretty much."

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Perhaps that contractor went back to steal the marble statue,' George said quickly.
George: "Here we go; might as well humor her..."
'He seemed to want it very badly.'
'I thought of that possibility,' Nancy admitted. 'Or it could have been Mr. Albin searching for the ship model.'
'I don't believe that pleasant old man would enter the house without permission,' Bess declared." (page 151-152)
Bess: "Even though we do it all the time."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Nancy] offered no reply, but her lips drew into a firm line. She knew she had not been mistaken. However, she was puzzled to find no evidence of the prowler.
The girls sat down by the fountain and listened to the angry roar of the ocean.
Awww, is someone projecting?
'This place gives me the creeps,' Bess shivered. 'I don't see why you like to come here, Nancy.'
Nancy: "Shut up! Can't you see I'm brooding?"
'Ever since we arrived in Sea Cliff, our detective chum has been trying to tack a mystery onto this place,' George chuckled. 'The setting is perfect,
George: "But the characters are way off."
but somehow the mystery refuses to develop.'
Nancy: /wrists
Nancy suddenly held up her hand in a gesture which commanded silence." (page 153)
Nancy: "BROODING!!1!!!1!"

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy was sorely puzzled as to what course to follow, when suddenly an idea came to her. She would frighten [Mitza] by whispering to him a warning which would appear to come from the marble statue!
... America's number-one detective, folks. Be afraid, very afraid.
The daring girl realized that the scheme could fail.
Nooooo.
Mitza might decide to invesigate, in which case she would be discovered. The trick was worth trying, however.
'I'll be aided by the gathering darkness and the roar of the ocean,' she thought." (page 157)
Nancy: "See, I told Bess becoming a Satanist would pay off!"

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy wrapped her white dress closer about her so that the wind could not whip it into view. Then she began to moan softly,
Um.
trying to blend the weird sound with the soughing of the wind in the pine boughs overhead.
Joe Mitza stood perfectly still and turned his eyes toward the marble statue. He listened intently.
Mitza: "Sayyyyy..."
He listened intently.
'K-e-e-p a-w-a-y,' Nancy
Narrator: "-- Spelled."
whispered warningly. 'K-e-e-p a-w-a-y."
 (page 157-158)
Mitza: "Hey, Miss Morse, I'm starting to get the feeling that maybe I should keep away. That okay with you?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"All was silent within, but from far down the beach the girl heard a sound which caused her to turn her head alertly. Someone was approaching the house from that direction." (page 163)
I want to know where she got her super-powered hearing.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Oh, my!' the old man ejaculated,
Ack! TMI, TMI!
his around flying upward as if to ward off the blow from an attacker." (page 164)

Nancy does have that affect on people sometimes.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I am pretty badly tuckered,' the old gentleman admitted, sitting down wearily on the sagging veranda steps. 'I've been tramping about all day long, trying to get up enough courage to come here and do a wicked deed.'" (page 165)
Mr. Albin: "So, is Miss Morse still around? That sexy thing."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Old Mr. Albin painfully arose from the steps. He glanced uneasily toward the homestead, shivering as he contemplated entering it.
House-raper. :|
'I'd hate to have anyone see me do this,' he muttered.
Mr. Albin: "My soul just feels so unclean!"
Nancy thought that it was time she warned him about Miss Morse.
Nancy: "I think he's finally ready to know."
'If I were you I'd wait a little while before trying to get the ship model,' Mr. Albin. A strange woman is inside the house now.'
Nancy: "We think she might be rabid."
'A woman?'" (page 166)
Mr. Albin: "I haven't seen one of those in over sixty years!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'She must have come to steal some of the furnishings,' [Mr. Albin] cried, growing excited.
Mr. Albin: "I could help her with that!"
'Mr. Conger collected valuable antiques, and it would be very easy for anyone to carry them away.'" (page 166-167)
Mr. Albin: "I suppose now would be a good time for me to mention that I had a huge boycrush on Mr. Conger back in the day."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When the statue had been lowered safely into the trunk, the two men rested from their labors. But their tongues did not remain idle." (Page 174)
Frenching?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'You crazee. Now go on down-a-da street. Minda your own beezaness.'" (page 175)
I would just like to point out that this book is physically painful to read at this point.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'You have-a-da mon,' he said. 'Now you go-- queek!'" (page 176)
I didn't even understand that. I think it's just gibberish at this point.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The big truck roared away at high speed, conveying a piece of prized statuary to some unknown location." (page 177)
That poor statue, so lost and alone in the world! I'm touched, really.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I thought you would take a sensible attitude about things, Miss Morse,' Mitza said irritably. 'I tried my best to keep our agreement. I swear I brought the money here tonight, but I dropped the roll of bills in the garden. When I went back to look for it it was gone.'
'Such a story sounds very unlikely to me,' Miss Morse replied tartly. 'You can't expect me to turn over my five
thousand dollars unless you put up a similar amount.'" (page 181-182)
So they're just... exchanging identical sums of money? I don't get this book at all.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I don't believe you have five thousand dollars,' Mitza said crossly. 'You've been stringing me along.'
'Yes, I have the money,' the old woman insisted. 'Right here in my purse.'" (page 182)
Miss Morse: "... And now that I've told you that, don't you DARE steal it!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As [Nancy] struggled to free herself she was amazed to discover that the woman was as strong as a man." (page 187)
... *golf clap*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Well, they've gone. Not that I was afraid to be found here, but it's always just as well not to invite an investigation. Police like to dig up false facts and put the blame on anyone they can.'" (page 190)
Nancy: "Hey, that's not tr-- oh wait, it kind of is."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'My name is not really Miss Morse,' the woman went on patiently, 'nor is yours Joe Mitza.'
'You're wrong there. My name is Mitza.'
'No,' the woman denied, 'you just think it is.'" (page 192)
Mitza: "... I know you are but what am I?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy's fingers were not idle as she listened to the amazing tale." (page 196)
Um.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Neither Mitza nor Miss Morse seemed aware of the girl's presence. The woman was weeping now, and her son berated her for being such a sentimental fool." (page 196)
Awww, what a touching reunion scene.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy did not believe that her chums had really deserted her. She thought they might have become alarmed over her prolonged absence and gone back to Sea Cliff for help. The result, however, was the same." (page 200)
Narrator: "And they would pay for it just as dearly."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The Drew girl did not wish to be seen. With the sheet wrapped around her she once more assumed the pose of a statue, remaining motionless as the woman staggered toward her. Miss Morse dropped down on one kneww. With her head bent low she began to pray, asking forgiveness for the wicked life which she had led.
At first Nancy kept silent, scarcely daring to move a muscle lets her identity be discovered. As she listened to the humble plea of the repentant woman, sympathy overcame caution. She whispered a few consoling words in an attempt to calm Miss Morse.
Slowly the old lady raised her head, as if to hear more clearly. Her lips moved, yet she spoke no word. Confident that Miss Morse believed the statue had spoken, Nancy became more daring and offered additional spiritual advice." (page 201)
Imagine the business she'd get if she tried this in a church.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Seek shelter within the house,' Nancy directed in a whisper, for she was eager to quit the scene herself." (page 202)
... You mean the house that's about to collapse? That house?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Slowly at first, then with a sickening plunge the great homestead with its two helpless occupants toppled over the bank to be claimed by the triumphant sea!
Man, I always knew the ocean was evil.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As the car halted at the main road George cast a startled glance at her [Bess and Mr. Drew]. She had heard a strange reverberating crash come from the direction of Old Estate.
'What was that?' she asked. 'It sounded just as if the house had tumbled into the sea!'" (page 207)
Yeah, and not only that, the sea was happy about it.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I know Nancy couldn't be out there,' [Carson] whispered to himself, 'yet something keeps telling me she is.'" (page 209)
Very decisive of you, Mr. Drew.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"For once in his life the lawyer lost his usual calm." (page 210)
Hahaha, once? No. I distinctly remember him expressing the desire to "thrash somone until they begged for mercy" in one of the earlier books.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'It's Nancy!' George cried in relief. 'And she's carrying something in her arms. Can it be a child?'" (page 211)
George: "I didn't know she was pregnant!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Since it was impossible to bring [Mitza] to his mother's bedise, Nanc bought a huge bouquet of roses and sent them to the hospital with a card bearing the name of the woman's son. The deed brought her considerable satisfaction two days later when she was informed that Miss Morse had lapsed into a coma from which she never aroused." (page 213)
... Dot. Dot. Dot.

You are a strange one, Nancy Drew.


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