[identity profile] banerry.livejournal.com posting in [community profile] whatnancysaid
The original, unrevised version from the 30s- in which we learn that Bess is short for Elizabeth, and that George is, in fact, George's real name. 
Also, I would like to apologize for my excessive use of the word 'stalk' in this entry. It all seemed necessary at the time.

"Nancy Drew, curled up like a contented kitten on the living room davenport,
Okay, so she's a Playboy bunny now?
smiled at the earnest entreaties of her friends, Elizabeth Marvin 
Say what now?
and George Fayne." (page 1)
So Bess gets a full name, but George doesn't? What were her parents smoking, anyway?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'Why, you're not a bit homely,' Nancy assured [George] promptly. 'I think you're quite distinctive looking myself.'
'You base flatterer!
Nancy: "Okay, fine, you're ugly. Happy?"
Look at this straight hair and my pug nose! And everyone says I'm irresponsible and terribly boyish.'
'Well, you sort of pride yourself on being boyish, don't you? Your personality fits in with your name, you will admit.'
Okay, okay, crash course on the characters- we get it. Moving on now?
'I do like my name,' George admitted, 'but I get tired of explaining to folks that it isn't short for Georgia.'" (page 2-3)
George: "And why I didn't bother changing it after the operation."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Yet, had a stranger entered the room,
Narrator: "Bess would have screamed, George would have hit him over the head with a blunt object, and Nancy would have rifled through his pockets, trying to figure out his identity."
he undoubtedly would have looked first at Nancy Drew,
Well, duh. Her name is on the cover, after all.
for thought she could not be termed beautiful,
Ahem? The revised books beg to differ.
her face was more interesting than that of either of her companions." (page 4)
I take this to mean that she looks like a Picasso painting.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'You mean [Alice's father] deserted his wife and child?' Nancy questioned. 
'Well, of course that was what everyone said at the time, though his wife never would admit it. She always thought that something dreadful had happened to him. 
Yes, that's a much more comforting thought. He didn't desert them, he was killed in a brutal accident!
You see, he started off on a buisness trip to Philidelphia.
Oh yes, that's the way it always goes...
Apparently he never went there.'
...
'Were his business affairs in bad shape?'
'That's what made it all seem so queer,' Elizabeth explained. 'He had no debts and his business was prosperous.'
'Did he have enemies?'" (page 5)
Bess: "Geez, Nancy! He wasn't offed by the mafia, okay?!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'I should love to go,' Nancy declared. 'I've never visited an honest-to-goodness ranch. I'll talk to Dad about it and see what he says. I don't like to leave him here alone for such a long time.'" (page 6-7)
Bess: "Oh, is that why you never went to college? I always thought it was because you we're accepted at any of-"
Nancy: (grits teeth) "Yes, Bess, that's why."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'Oh Dad, you don't really think I could go, do you?' Nancy began quickly. 'I told the girls that if you needed me here-'
'I always need you,' her father replied gravely, but with a twinkle in his eye." (page 7)
... Okay. I'd heard tell that the two of them flirt even more obviously in the original books- I'm just glad to see it for myself!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'I think I'll run up to Canada for a couple of weeks of fishing while you're gone,' Mr. Drew told his daughter... 'Of course, I'd like to have you go along, but there will be three men besides the guides, and I couldn't expect the others to enjoy having you as much as I should.'
'I rather guess not! I nearly broke up the party the last time I went. It wasn't my fault 
Mr. Drew: "Oh, it never is, is it?"
that I hooked a twelve pound muskie.'" (page 8)
Nancy: "It's not my fault that I'm perfect- it just happened!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Excited at the prospect of spending the summer at Shadow Ranch, Nancy Drew plunged into an orgy of feverish preparation.'" (page 10)
*giggles like a twelve-year-old boy*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Nancy's mother had died only a few years after her birth, 
Then how was she able to get married and have Nancy? ... I don't want to know.
and the girl had assumed the management of the Drew household at an early age." (page 12)
Narrator: "Remember, Carson Drew is and always has been completely unable to take care of himself."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Alice was indeed pretty as a picture and when she spoke it was with a soft, drawling voice that captivated Nancy at once. Yet she could not help noticing that the girl's deep blue eyes were listless and sad save when she smiled.
'Where's Uncle Dick?' George demanded bluntly when the introductions had been completed." (page 14)
Mrs. Rawley: "I do wish you wouldn't refer to him that way, dear. It's not nice."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Nancy asked [Ross Rogers] a few more questions which the man answered politely, but as he did not seem especially disposed to talk, she soon fell silent. Yet, she could not help but steal an occasional glance at him, and was surprised at the thoughtful, sad expression which had settled upon his face." (page 18)
Yup, he's Alice's father. Or at least he's related to her in some way- I'm sure of that. Those 'thoughtful, sad expressions' and 'eyes that are listless and sad' are hereditary in these books, you know.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

'That man interests me,' she told the girls after they had returned to their own car.
'I don't see anything interesting about him,' George scoffed. 'I thought he was sort of stupid.'" (page 19)
Ahahaha. I love you, George. Don't ever change.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"While the three girls had been discussing the stranger, Alice Regor had remained silent, but now she gave her opinion.
Alice: "You all are losers. Who cares about the creepy old man, anyway? I'm sure he's not back in his compartment wondering, 'Hmmm. Who was that titian-haired girl I was talking to before? She interests me!'" 
Bess: "Trust me... yes he is."
'I hope we do see him again. I like him- a lot.'
Alice, we're less than three chapters into the book and already, you're kind of freaking me out. 
'Someone stands up for me!' Nancy announced triumphantly." (page 20)
Nancy: "The rest of you- PWNED! MWAHAHAHA!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"George Fayne glanced... out the window of the swift-moving train. 'The country looks a little barren here, doesn't it?'" (page 21)
Yes, George. It's called a 'desert'. You're going to Arizona- learn to love them.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'I wish I could have said good-bye to [Ross Rogers], but haven't seem him all afternoon. He's as shy as our Alice here.'
'I'm not shy,' Alice defended herself. 'I just can't think of things to say.'" (page 22)
Nancy: "Okay, boring then, whatever."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"So interested were [the girls] in their surroundings that they failed to notice Ross Rogers swing from the train just before it started." (page 23)
Narrator: "But luckily, you readers have me to tell you when things like this happen. Aren't you pleased?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"As Mrs. Rawley mentioned each one by name, [George Miller] muttered a 'pleased to meet you' and twisted his tattered felt hat with his anguished hands.
Don't you just love the imagery in these books?
However, when George Fayne was introduced his shyness left him and he stared at the girl almost hostilely." (page 26)
George Miller: "Oh God, I can already imagine the confusion and wild hijinks our shared name will get us into... just kill me now, okay?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Nancy Drew and George Fayne had been given a room together on the first floor while the others were to be quartered on the floor above.
'Well, how do you like it?' George demanded when they were together." (page 31)
She's always 'demanding' things, or asking questions 'bluntly'. The ghostwriters hate George, don't they?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'[George Miller] seems obsessed with the idea that George isn't any name for a girl. I heard him complaining about it to his wife only a few minutes ago.'
George: "Before he ordered her back to the kitchen, of course."
'What do you care?'
George: "Um, I have no life?"
'Oh, I don't,' George laughed indifferently.
George: "And I only bring it up to illustrate that point even more!"
'Still, I intend to make him like it before the summer is over!'" (page 31)
George: "That's exactly how much I don't care!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'Not one of [the cowboys] is under forty years of age!' Bess complained in an undertone to Nancy as they all went outdoors to inspect the barns and the stock.
Nancy: "Oh, well. You take what you can get, I guess."
'Oh, why couldn't one have been young and handsome?'" (page 32)
Geez- calm down, Bess. You'll get your fair share of hotties in the revised edition, I promise.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'Say, don't none of you know how to ride?'
Because absolutely no one from the west can speak in proper grammar.
'Nancy does,' George declared.
'I can ride a little, but I'm no expert,' Nancy insisted modestly." (page 32)
Based on this statement, we're expected to assume she's freakin' Annie Oakley.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"It seemed to Nancy that she had scarcely tumbled into bed when the alarm clock was warning her that it was time to get up. She rolled over and nudged George in the back,
For the edification of those of you just joining us in Nancyland- in these books, 'sharing a room' always means 'sharing a bed'. 
but that sleepy girl merely groaned and buried her head in the covers.
'Come on, lazy!' Nancy cried, pulling her out of bed.
'I've decided to wait until to-morrow morning,' George pleaded.
'Not much you haven't! Come on out, young lady!'" (page 33)
George: "Seriously? You're not my mom. And I'm the butch one- I could totally kick your ass."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"While Nancy Drew had never taken many riding lessons, it was true that she had her horse well and rode with confidence and ease. The cowboys had watched her admiringly as she galloped about the field." (page 35)
The Cowboys: "Excellent. Tomorrow- bronco time!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Even Bess Marvin came to look forward to the lessons, though a number of tumbles served to remind her in an unpleasant way that she had not improved as rapidly as the others." (page 36)
Bess Marvin: the ghostwriters' punching bag.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'It's a splendid day for riding,' Nancy Drew remarked to the guide. 
'Yes,' Jack Glenwell replied with a glance at the sky. 'Still, I can'tsay that I like the looks of those clouds over to the southwest. Storms come up here pretty quick sometimes.'
Nancy cast a quick glance in the direction indicated but to her the clouds did not appear threatening." (page 37-38)
Nancy: "Meh. Who cares what the guy who's lived here all his life thinks. Let's go trailriding!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"However, instead of accepting the plate of food which had been prepared for him, [Jack Glenwell] called Nancy aside. 
'I don't want to alarm the others,' he told her quietly, 
Jack: ",,, but I"m quite looking forward to freaking you out."
'but there's a bad storm coming up.
Jack: "I still say we keep everyone else in the dark, though. It's much more dramatic that way."
Nancy: "But-"
Jack: "Trust me on this one."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"'We must keep going,' the guide insisted. 'You don't kow these storms the way I do. We must get back to Big Bear Creek and ford it before the flood waters strand us on the mountain.'" (page 40)
Bess: *faints*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Emerging from the wood, they came into view of the stream and stopped in amazement. There before them was Big Bear Creek, but from a listless little stream it had been transformed to a raging torrent, and at each moment the water was risig higher." (page 41-42)
Bess: *dies of fright*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"Bess stared at the racing water with horror in her eyes. 
'I can't do it,' she wailed, for her courage had left her at the last minute.
Pfft. Like she ever had any to begin with.
'Nonsense!' Nancy told her sharply. 'Don't be a coward! Go on!'" (page 43)
Geez, Nancy's mean in these books!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

"At first Nancy's frightened pony whirled, refusing to enter the boisterous water. Then the girl gained the mastery and forced the animal first to the edge of the stream and then into the rushing flood of waters." (page 46)
Ah, glad to see the animal abuse and traumatization in the revised adition has some foundation here.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'There's a cottage about a quarter of a mile from here.' 
'There's no danger of the flood extending that far?'
'Not unless it rains for several hours.'" (page 45)
You know it's going to, of course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Though dressed in the ugliest rags imaginable, the child was unusually pretty; she had almost prefect features
Is that a typo, or are you comparing her to a private-school snitch?
and her curly golden hair would have been lovely had it been properly washed. The girl's face was thin and she looked undernourished. Nancy's heart went out to her at once, for it seemed a pity that such an attractive child must live in such wretched circumstances. Obviously, Martha Frank gave her no care or attention." (page 48)
So if she were ugly, she would have totally deserved it, I suppose?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'How was Lucy in her school work?'
'They say she was as bright as any of them, but that only made it harder for her to make friends. The other children taunted her about being a squatter and wouldn't have anything to do with her.'
'I suppose not,' Nancy said musingly." (page 52)
Nancy: "I know I wouldn't if I were them."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'But surely she couldn't manage on the garden alone. She must have some money.' 
'Oh, I guess she has a little- enough to buy meat and staples.'" (page 52)
Nancy: "Wow! But what would she use the staples for?"
Jack: "Just... shut up, okay?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Nancy] felt certain that Lucy Brown came of far better stock than squatter quality." (page 53)
Ah, don't you love how these books are even more snobby and judgemental than the revised versions?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'[Alice is] worrying about her father again?' George nodded.
'That's what I think, though she won't tell me a thing. She just bottles her trouble up inside of her and it makes her dreadfully unhappy.'
'I feel so sorry for her.' 
'So do I,' Bess agreed, 'but there's nothing we can do about it.' Abruptly she changed the subject. 'Do you feel like hiking this morning?'" (page 54)
Oh, real sensitive, Bess.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I was going to say, if only father hadn't gone away. Oh, Nancy!' [Alice] flung out her hands in a gesture of despair. 'Everyone said he ran away and left Mother and me, but I know he didn't! I just know it!'
'I'm sure he didn't,' Nancy agreed comfortingly.
Nancy: "Does patronization make you feel better, by the way? It usually works..."
'I've already heard something of the story, so you needn't tell me about it.'" (page 55)
Alice: "What? I haven't told you anything about my backstory!"
Nancy: "I know, but Bess and George did. Besides, everyone knows- we've been gossiping about you like crazy."
Alice: *emo-tear*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I wish I could help you, Alice.'
'I'm afraid no one can do that, Nancy. Some day father will come back and then everything will be right again.'" (page 55)
Geez, the kid's going to be disappointed when her father does end up coming back (because you know he will, right?), and the world doesn't all of a sudden turn picture-perfect. 
...
Oh, who am I kidding? This is a Nancy Drew book- it probably will.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'[Alice's] entire vacation will be ruined,' Nancy told herself. 'If only I could think of something taht would help her to forget!'" (page 56)
Oh, yeah- forgetting her missing father. That should be easy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'The only thing is that I must arrange to ship [the steers] without delay. That will mean a round-up.'
'A round-up?' Nancy cried eagerly.
'Oh, man!' George exclaimed enthusiastically, forgetting that her aunt frowned upon slang.
*snerk*
'I never thought I'd get to see a real round up!'" (page 58)
Ahem. Some of your readers know very little about ranching life, you know... care to share with the rest of the class, girls?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Will the men let us help, do you suppose?' Nancy asked hopefully. 'It would be fun to be one of the riders.'
Mrs. Rawley: "Oh sure, why not? Let's suspend reality just a little bit more today!"
'I'll speak to Mr. Miller about it. He says you are all getting to be experts and I know we'll have to have some extra help.'
Mrs. Rawley: "After all, Jack Glenwell was already irresponsible enough to let you guys cajole him into trailriding with a huge storm on the way... why not continue the tradition?"
'I"m sure Mr. Miller wasn't thinking of me when he said that,' Bess said with sigh. 'If we have a round-up I'll be relegated to the fence.'
'Would you like to ride if Mr. Miller will let us?' Nancy asked, turning to Alice.
'Indeed I would,' 
Alice: "Excluding Bess is fun!"
Alice replied quickly with more enthusiasm than she had shown for many days." (page 59)
So much enthusiasm, apparently, that she's forgotten all about commas.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[George Miller] bestowed a provoking grin upon George and pronounced her name with an accent on the 'Fayne'. From the first he had steadily refused to call her George, although he addressed the others by their first names." (page 60)
And you know that's got to be driving her crazy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Then it's all decided,' Mrs. Rawley announced as she turned toward the house. 'We'll have the big round-up day after tomorrow.' 
'This won't be no big round-up,' the foreman protested, quick to correct the Eastern lady who had shown such an aptitude for the ranching business." (page 61)
Hee. I love the character descriptions in these books.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Though George Miller continued to make disparaging remarks about the coming round-up, the girls decided that most of them were for the purpose of impressing the new ranch owner." (page 61)
Awwww- somebody's got their very first crush!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'They must brand the calves before turning them back to pasture,' Nancy explained.
Nancy: "How do I know this? Well, I am inexplicably  ranching expert here, after all."
'I don't think I want to watch that!'
Yet when the time came Bess Marvin did watch, and became even more excited than the others.
Bess, you sadist!
From the safety of the fence the girls saw the cowboys wrestle with the calves, tie their legs together, and finally drag them to the branding irons." (page 66)
Oh, so that's why she's interested... she's into S&M, I guess.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'The men are driving the cattle to Mougarstown to-day,' Mrs. Rawley told the girls at the breakfast table. 'Any of you want to go to town?'
Alice: "Not really."
Bess: "No thanks."
'We all do,' George told her, answering for the others." (page 66)
Bess: "God, it bugs me when you do that!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'It's nearly five o'clock now and we'll just have time to buy the groceries before the stores start to close.'
'This isn't the city,' Nancy reminded her. 'The stores will be open until ten o'clock.'" (page 68)
What? Doesn't it work the other way around?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy Drew and George Fayne had no desire to pry into business which did not concern them,
I love how Nancy is in constant denial of her true character.
but as a loud clamor issued from within the old junk shop, they paused involuntarily and glanced that way." (page 70)
Nancy: "I  didn't want to look- it was involuntary, dammit! Involuntary! I'm not nosy! So there!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I wonder who [Martha Frank] was quarrelling with,' Nancy mused thoughtfully. 'I certainly wasn't favorably impressed with that man's appearance.'" (page 71)
Hee. I love how snobby old!Nancy is.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'If you girls go alone, I must insist that you take a revolver,' Mrs. Rawley said, glancing up from the magazine she was reading.
The Girls: "Yay for loose gun control!"
'Mr. Miller tells me that "there's b'ar in them mountains."'
George: "A bar? Oh, goody!"
'Oh, a bear would't have a ghost of a show if he met four young huskies like us,' George laughed. 'However, we'll do as you suggest. Nancy can tote the gun because she's the only one that could hit the broad side of a barn.'" (page 76)
Nancy: "That's right... so Bess, watch out."
Bess: (to herself) "Is it a good thing that we're entrusting a gun to the person who's hands-down the most mentally unstable?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'But what if the ponies don't happen to go back to the ranch?' Nancy asked quietly.
George: "Yeah, they're probably all down at that bar that Aunt Nell mentioned."
'In that case-' her voice trailed off.
'In that case,' George finished with a show of optimism, 'We'll just have to walk home.'
'Walk eight miles?' Bess gasped. 'I never walked that far in my life.'" (page 81)
She's probably never walked one mile in her life.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Involuntarily, her hand touched the holster at her belt.
*Adds 'involuntarily reaching for guns' to list of reasons Nancy is likely to completely snap someday*
How thankful she was that Mrs. Rawley had insisted that she carry the revolver. The indications were that before the night was over she would again have need of it." (page 83)
Nancy: "If Bess doesn't stop that insufferable whining...!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"For some time the girls had trudged bravely down the steep mountain trail, but with fatigue had come discouragement, and Bess had been the first to falter." (page 84)
And I don't think anyone is surprised at that. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Silently the girls trudged down the trail, at a more rapid pace than before, for the fear of being caught on the mountain after dark was upon them all. Yet Nancy, who was bringing up the rear, observed that Geroge was limping and she knew what that meant. They would soon be forced to slacken their speed." (page 86)
Narrator: "Involuntarily, Nancy's hand touched the holster at her belt..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Nancy] was not at all surprised when Martha Frank opened the door and stared at the girls hostilely as though questioning their right to come near her cottage." (page 88)
Nancy: "Hmph! Imagine the nerve of someone being annoyed at me for trespassing!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'No, no,' [Ross Rogers] muttered nervously. 'Everyone calls me Rogers, but my name is really Roger.'
'Roger?'
The man avoided Mrs. Rawley's steady gaze.
'Yes, I'm sure it's Roger.'" (page 97)
Ross: "Nah, just kidding. I really have no idea."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Well, that man is stupid!' George broke out. 'Imagine not knowing your own name!'" (page 97)
*cough* Imagine not knowing your own gender.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Girls, I have it! It came back to me all at once! George, don't you remember [Ross Rogers]?'
'Can't say that I do.'
Nancy: "*Now* who's stupid?"
'Why, he was a teller in the River Heights First National Bank. As I recall, he worked there about six months and then drifted away.'
Nancy: "Of course, I can't be absolutely sure it was him until we get home and I'm able to check my detailed log of all the bank tellers I've ever done business with."
'Wasn't he the one that got a job because he rescued the bank president's daughter from being run over by a reckless automobile driver?'" (page 98-99)
Well, that's sure a trustworthy way to pick who gets to handle the citizen's bank accounts.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Not in the least daunted by their early misadventures, they rode horseback and roamed the mountain trails, gained weight,
You'd think that with all their supposed exercise they'd be losing weight.
and developed smooth coats of tan." (page 101)
They turned into yellow labs!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'[The fish are] probably down at the bottom of the pool having a good laugh anyway,' George returned.
'I wouldn't put it past them,' Nancy agreed. 'They say trout are remarkably intelligent fish. They have a keen sense of sight as well as hearing.'" (page 103)
... The fish aren't conspiring against you, Nancy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Breathless, they reached the clearing, but did not halt there or glance back. At breakneck speed they sought to put as great a distance between themselves and the cougar as possible." (page 106-107)
Oh yes, let's try to outrun the wild cougar. That always works. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Aunt Nell will have nervous prostration when she learns about this,' George declared, as the girls continued toward the ranch. 'It does seem as though we were destined for adventure and breath-taking escapes.'" (page 107)
I find it amusing that she's just figuring this out now.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Bess was quite taken with a young lawyer,
No, Bess- run! He'll milk you for all you're worth! 
David Glaston, and as the feeling was mutual, there were no dull moments for her that evening. George and Alice were never without partners, while Nancy was in so much demand that she was forced to refuse dances." (page 109)
Well, I see all's well in Nancy-land...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The truth was that Nancy had hoped to see Ross Rogers at the dance, and in this she had been disappointed." (page 110)
NANCY. For goodness sakes, the man is old enough to be your father. Oh, wait, I forgot she goes for that.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Do you know, you remind me of someone I once knew in River Heights.' 
Ross Rogers stared at her an instant and then lowered his eyes." (page 110)
Ross Rogers: "Oh, God, the Witness Protection Program promised that no one would ever find me...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I'm going to forget all about [Ross Rogers],' [Nancy] told herself.
Oh yeah, let's see how long that lasts.
'It's obvious he doesn't care to have his past known, and I have no right to go prying into his affairs.'" (page 113)
Nancy, I'm afraid you're in deep, deep denial about your personality...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The girls had been riding in the mountains, as was now their daily custom, when Nancy observed that the sky was overcast. At once they started for the ranch, but it was evident that it would rain before they could reach home.
'Let's stop at the cottage,' Nancy suggested." (page 114)
Nancy: "I'm sure Martha Frank won't mind us forcing our way into her home for the third time this week! After all, we all know how kind and generous she is!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Though Alice Regor and Bess Marvin had edged nearer the door, and George Fayne
This is just to make sure we don't all forget their last names, I suppose?
was plucking at her sleeve trying to draw her away, [Nancy] had no intention of retreating. She knew that she had done nothing wrong, and for that reason refused to be frightened away from the cottage." (page 119)
Nancy: "After all, I live here! ... Oh, wait..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Do we look as though we would break into people's houses?' Nancy asked sharply." (page 120)
Because walking in through an unlocked door is really that much different... you're forgetting about the 'entering' part of breaking and entering, Nancy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"On the way the girls continued to discuss Zany's strange actions, but for the most part Nancy remained silent, apparently lost in deep thought." (page 122)
Narrator: "The other girls had know way of realizing that she had actually slipped into a waking coma."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"For some minutes Nancy could think of no plausible theory, and then with a flash it came. Kidnapping!" (page 125)
Nancy: "That's how I'll earn the money to buy Niko Van Dyke's new record- kidnapping!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'There's probably nothing to that kidnapping idea,' Nancy decided at last.
Nancy, if there's one thing I've learned from these books, it's this- there is always something to that kidnapping idea.
'But just for the fun of it I'll assume that there is and see what I can discover.'" (page 125)
Entertaining paranoid and delusional thoughts about other people's misery that always turn out to be right- now there's the Nancy we know and love!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy realized that the solution of the mystery would depend in part at least upon the information which must be secured in Philadelphia. Without her her father's aid her hands would be tied, for she would not dare to go ahead without definite evidence. To do so might involve her in serious trouble, perhaps a suit for damages." (page 126-127)
Nancy: "No. I must wait until Dad is here before I do anything illegal- that way, he can properly cover up the evidence like always!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I thought at first we had stumbled upon a mystery,' Bess continued. 'But since I've been thinking
 Nancy: *groans* "Bess! How many times have I told you to stop doing that? It ruins all my plans!"
it over I've convinced myself that we were jumping at conclusions. There's nothing so unusual about a trunk of old-fashioned clothes. We have lots of them in our own attic.'
Bess: "And most of them actually belong to us!"
'But you aren't a squatter,' Nancy returned dryly. 'Such children don't have expensive jewelry and elegant lace dresses.'
Nancy: "Such children make me sick."
'That's so,' Bess admitted.
'It may be as you say that there's nothing wrong at all, 
But we all know it isn't, right?
but just the same I intend to have another look at that trunk. I'd like to go back to the cottage this afternoon.'
'Oh, not this afternoon,' Bess protested. 'We've planned to go to Chimney Rock, and Alice and George thought to-day would be the best time.'" (page 127-128)
Bess: "I just want to see it once- my oxen keep dying before I get there when I play Oregon Trail..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'You round up George and Alice and I'll change into my riding habit." (page 128)
Does she really need seperate riding clothes to go trail-riding?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'How about lunch?' Nancy asked.
'We have enough to feed an army,' Alice told her." (page 128)
Nancy: "... So, not enough for Bess, then."
Alice: "Not even close."
Nancy: *sigh*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy looked perplexed. She had no idea which trail to take, for they both looked alike. She blamed herself that she had not noted various landmarks, even though George had been leading the party." (page 132)
Nancy, just so you know- constantly blaming yourself isn't humble or kind. Iit's just annoying.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Which direction do you think we are going?' Nancy asked quietly. 
'Why, east of course.'
'We're going almost straight south,' Bess declared.
Nancy smiled grimly." (page 133)
Nancy: "i swear, I am about this close to killing you all."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"CHAPTER XVII
A Night of Horror" (page 135)
Hee. Right. This 'suspense' right here PHAILS.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Lost! The very word struck Nancy Drew and her friends with terror." (page 135)
Oh, come on you guys- the show hasn't gotten that bad.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'What are we to do?' Bess demanded bluntly.
Ahem. I though only George was allowed to do things bluntly.
'We can't stay here and wait for a searching party that may never come. I'm freezing to death already.'" (page 137)
... I thought it was summer? And they are in the southwest, after all- that's not exactly the North Pole, even at night..
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'It looks like a bear cave to me,' Bess cried anxiously. 'Oh, let's hunt for another place.'
'You can't tell a bear cave by the outside,' Nancy returned, with a laugh." (page 140)
Nancy: "We could spend the night in here and not even realize it until the bear kills us!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"To [Nancy's] intense relief, she found that there was no need to use the weapon,
Nancy: "Awww, what a shame!"
for already the animal had moved away, evidently discouraged by the sharp thorns which barred the opening to the cave." (page 144)
Well, that's one of the most easily discouraged blood-thirsty man-eaters I've heard of.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"After eating the fruit and drinking at the spring which they found not far from the cave and looking after the ponies..." (page 145)
Whoah, whoah! Slow down there! It's okay, there's nearly sixty pages left in the book- you have room for a comma or two.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"I'm hungry enough to eat a fried rock,' Bess remarked." (page 146)
Tsk, tsk, Bess- it'll be healthier if you bake it.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Hello?' Nancy greeted [Lucy]. 'What are you doing here? You aren't lost too?'
'Lost?' Lucy demanded with a scornful toss of her head. 'I know every trail on this mountain.'" (page 147)
Lucy: "I've been hiding in the bushes all night, laughing at you lot and your incompetency!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Nancy] was still considering the problem when she rode up to the cottage. Of course, she could always threaten Martha,
Well, that does usually seem to be her preferred method...
but she had little evidence to substantiate any accusation she might make. If only she had heard from her father!
Nancy:(whining) "It's just so hard to fabricate evidence all by myself!"
Tying up her pony she walked up to the cottage and then stopped short in amazement. The front door was open, permitting Nancy a glimpse of the interior." (page 153)
Nancy: "Wow, I don't even have to break in this time!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The foreman scratched his head thoughtfully. Though he still pretended an indifference toward the girls, especially George Fayne whose name he had never acknowledged..." (page 157)
... So, are they actually going to go somewhere with this little 'chauvinist cowboy won't accept a girl having a boy's name' subplot? Because it's getting kind of weird and pointless. (Not that it wasn't weird and pointless from the beginning, of course, but you know..."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I thought we could follow this trail as far as Martha Frank's cabin,' [Doctor Cole] suggested." (page 161)
Dr. Cole: "Nancy needs to get her daily stalk in, after all."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'A broken arm seems to be the most apparent of [Lucy's] injuries,' [Dr. Cole] observed. 'If I can find something to use for a splint I'll be able to set it here. I don't think her unconsciousness indicates anything grave. 
Dr. Cole: "And if I'm wrong, you know who to sue!"
She'll soon come out of that." (page 166)
Dr. Cole: "You do realize that my doctorate is in anthropology, right?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Her name was Louise Bowen, a child of three and a half years. She mysteriously disappeared from her father's house and it was believed that she was taken by a discharged furnace man who sought to avenge himself.'" (page 172)
Note to self: Beware of guy who's coming to fix the furnace this week...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'If Lucy were really Louise Bowen, it seems probable that her kidnappers would have destroyed all evidence pertaining to her identity.'
'Meaning that doll and the clothes you saw in the trunk?'
'Exactly. Of course, they may have been too stupid to think of that.'" (page 174)
Nancy: "I mean, have you even seen Superman? They always are!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Get up, Nancy!' [George] commanded. 'Martha Frank is here to make trouble!'
'Who?' Nancy inquired sleepily." (page 175)
George: "What the... You're stalkee, Nancy! Get with the program!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Zany Shaw] made another clutch for her arm, but Nancy dodged quickly enough to elude his grasp. Now thoroughly frightened, she saw that Zany really intended to harm her. As he made a second spring, she struck out with all her might. It was no futile blow. Her fist landed squarely under Zany's chin. He staggered back, clutched at a chair and sagged to the floor." (page 179)
Congratulations, Nancy- you are now Kim Possible.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Doctor Cole glanced at [Nancy] quizzically, but did not question her, taking it for granted that she did not with to talk before a stranger.
Awww... Nancy's shy!
'Pardon us,' he said, 'I didn't think to ask. Of course you've met Ross Rogers?'
'Oh, yes, indeed.'" (page 180)
Nancy: "Met him? I've stalked the living daylights out of him!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Undoubtedly, Doctor Cole had not told [Ross Rogers] where he was going when they had set out. Otherwise, she doubted that he would have made the trip, for thought he was friendly enough upon occasions, he seemed to be afraid that Nancy and her friends would subject him to embarrassing questions." (page 180)
But, really- can you blame him? I don't think so.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'A lawyer!' Martha Frank gasped, her eyes dilating with fear.
Okay, seriously guys? That's not the typlcal reaction of people confronted with lawyers. Really. The police, maybe, but not lawyers.
'Yes, I intend to send for him unless you tell me everything,' Nancy declared.
'I don't know a thing about Lucy. I-'
'Ah, that means you do know a great deal, for I've not mentioned her name!' Nancy caught her up triumphantly." (page 185)
Martha: "... That doesn't even make sense. I mean, who else would you mean?"
Nancy: "Just... work with me here, okay?!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Yes, I'll tell you the entire story, but I want to tell it in my own way.'
Martha: "Full of lies."
'Go ahead,' [David Glaston] commanded.
'Zany Shaw is my brother.'
'Your brother?' Nancy interrupted involuntarily.
Martha: "That's what I said, you stupid little brat."
'That explains why I saw him so often at your cottage.'
'Partially. Eight years ago Zany and I lived in Philadelphia. He had a good job there and we were saving money and paying for a little house of our own.'" (page 187)
Martha: "Wait a second, I'm getting confused- is Zany my brother or my husband?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'... Zany may have his faults, but he ain't one to steal.'" (page 187)
Zany Shaw: the morally decent kidnapper.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'[Zany] watched his chance and one night he slipped into the house, took the child from the nursery, gagged her so she couldn't let out a scream, and then sneaked off with her and some of her things.'" (page 188)
Nancy: "So when you said he wasn't one the steal..."
Martha: "I meant other than little children, of course."
Nancy: "Of course. Please continue."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'... A man was standing at the curb and he tried to interfere. Zany tried to get away, but this man threatened to call the police. In desperation Zany picked up a piece of iron and threw it at him.'" (page 189)
I love it when I find a random piece of iron just when I need it. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I owe you all an apology for my recent behavior,' [Ross Rogers] began. 'I didn't mean to be rude. I was only troubled by not having a past.'
'I'm sure you were never rude,' Mrs. Rawley assured him graciously." (page 191)
Mrs. Rawley: "George did think you were a complete idiot, though. Oh, well!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I believe I must have gone to Philadelphia on a business trip and through curiosity had ventured into the poor section.'" (page 191-192)
Ross Rogers: "Poor city neighborhoods are kind of like zoos, right?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Zany probably didn't have a clear recollection of [Ross Rogers]. He was so excited that night he didn't know what he was about, the poor man.'" (page 193)
Martha Frank: "The poor, abusive, kidnapping man."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As Ross Rogers took a step toward Alice Regor, those who had witnessed the little drama exchanged startled glances. Was it possible that Alice had found her father at last? George Fayne, the first to recover from her surprise, whispered to Nancy: 
'They do resemble each other, but it doesn't seem possible they could be related. It would be too dramatic!'" (page 195)
George, where have you been for the past five books?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"It may be added that when a number of cowboys from Shadow Ranch visited the cabin a few days later, they found it deserted. Martha, together with Zany Shaw, had fled, in their haste leaving all household furniture behind. They were never heard from again." (page 197)
... So, the bad guys got away? I didn't think that was even possible in these books.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'What a wonderful thing for Lucy!' Nancy declared, after Martha was out of sight. 'To think that she is really Louise Bowen. With the fortune which has been left in her name, she'll be able to have all the things she needs clothes, an education, and good times.'" (page 197)
Nancy: "I just can't wait till Lucy is as spoiled and materialistic as the rest of us! Who says money can't buy happiness?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Good-bye,' [George] called. 
Mr. Miller opened his lips, but the words did not come. He swallowed and tried again. The train began to pull out of the station. Then he found his voice. 
'Good-bye,' he called gruffly. 'Good-bye- George.'" (page 201)
Say it with me- awwww!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'All right,' [Nancy] declared eagerly. 'Put out your sign. 'Carson Drew and Daughter.'" (page 203)
Live in concert!
 

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April 2012

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